Greyhound Leads

Greyhound Leads

There are many factors to consider than you might first realise, when it comes choosing a lead for your Greyhound. For example not only do you need to consider which lead works with the clip of the collar you have for your dog, but you need to take into account the length, strength and material used for that lead. Lead manufacturers take into consideration all kinds of needs and circumstances, not just for your dogs requirements, but for your needs as well. For example, if you have a dog that is strong and tends to pull on his lead, you may need something that will help take the strain away from your arm and back. However, this probably won’t be a factor that needs considering, as I am yet to meet a person that has this problem with their Greyhound.

Greyhounds are placid dogs with a lovely temperament, that makes them easy to train on and off their leads. They are highly intelligent, so this means they can be trained more efficiently and effectively. However all dogs have their own unique identity and personality, so your lead requirements will differ from Greyhound to Greyhound.

There are basic dog leads, retractable dog leads and leads that are specifically used when the owner is a runner and likes to take along their dog. Some dog training leads are required when training police dogs or rescue service dogs. A special harness is required for guide dogs for when they are working. It is interesting to note that the guide dog is trained to know when they are on the lead, rather than their harness. When they are off the harness, then they are ‘off duty’. This is because, although they are not required to guide their owner, they still need to be kept nearby or in control via their leads.

Greyhounds are renowned for being fast. They can reach speeds up to 43 miles per hour. So, you may wonder, with such ability, why put them on a lead at all?

Greyhounds are generally very sensitive, calm and placid creatures, and as a result they may not know how to handle an aggressive dog or owner they may encounter. It is a common mistake, that whereas an owner may feel its safe to keep their friendly and calm dog off the lead, the person walking towards them has a dog that is nervous, anxious and prone to attack. This is just down to thoughtfulness, and recognising, that like us, animals sometimes have there own baggage and personalities that mean we have to take extra care around them. A lead will help in this situation.

Other issues come into play, that means it is advisable that a lead is always on hand. Vehicle drivers need to be able to trust that your a dog walking along the roadside, isn’t suddenly going to dart out in front of their car or truck. For guidance and help in choosing your lead go to: www.premarketpets.com